News / Ottawa

Halloween gets therapeutic at warehouse dance party

Deep Therapy Halloween to help revellers transform

Resident Therapist Ali Harb DJs in front of a crowd at last year's Deep Therapy event.

PHOTOS BY THIRDEYE / Supplied

Resident Therapist Ali Harb DJs in front of a crowd at last year's Deep Therapy event.

Halloween revellers are getting set to dance their demons out – and the DJs are the therapists.

The warehouse at Albert Island is getting a complete spooky makeover for the Deep Therapy Halloween Party this Saturday, and although party-goers will have all night to get rowdy, the night is much more than just a Halloween bash.

“What makes it unique is that it’s an experience. It’s not just a party,” says promoter Farid Dagher, also the owner of the city’s only all-night dance club, City at Night.  

Dagher’s Deep Therapy events are just that – therapeutic music nights for revellers to rinse their souls to music that doesn’t overwhelm with repetitive and predicable bass drops, aggressive build ups or fitful choppy cadence that seems to go on without direction.

Great thought goes into selecting the right DJs for the right parties, but it even goes beyond the music. Dagher and his crew also put a heavy emphasis on art, and on creating an immersive space that adds a warm, welcoming vibe to an otherwise empty, dead space.

For this weekend’s spooky spin up, they are completely transforming an empty shell of a warehouse, with candles, art and immersive lighting all over the ceiling.

“There is somewhat of a cliché, people think that electronic music, anything that sounds underground is for a specific group of people, but we are trying to connect people to that music because it really has a therapeutic effect,” adds Dagher.

This year’s DJ lineup is as stellar as it’s ever been at Deep Therapy with Israeli DJ and Producer Chaim bringing his underground approach to helm the weekend party. The deep house DJ has graced some of the world’s top clubs including London’s infamous Fabric Panorama Bar in Berlin and Montreal’s Stereo.

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