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ID cards jamming up your wallet? An Ottawa company might have an app for that

An upstart Ottawa software company is testing an app it says could one day make all those photo ID cards jamming up your wallet a thing of the past.

Bluink founder Steve Borza's company has won a contract to look at putting government ID on mobile phones.

Mark Holleron / OTTAWA BUSINESS JOURNAL

Bluink founder Steve Borza's company has won a contract to look at putting government ID on mobile phones.

An upstart Ottawa software company is testing an app it says could one day make all those photo ID cards jamming up your wallet a thing of the past.

Bluink, which has been working on its password authentication technology since 2014, has won a contract with the Ontario government to develop a platform that would store electronic versions of driver’s licences, health cards and other government-issued ID on a user’s smartphone.

CEO Steve Borza said the $1.2-million pilot project could eventually render physical versions of such documents obsolete.

“For us, it’s a great start, and the opportunities beyond Ontario are huge,” he told OBJ. “As smartphone penetration in Canada gets deeper and deeper, it becomes the de facto standard in my mind.”

The provincially backed Ontario Centres of Excellence is funding 75 per cent of the project under the new Small Business Innovation Challenge, a program launched last spring to help SMEs bring new technologies to market. Bluink has teamed up with several other partners on the pilot, including Crypto4A, Canadian POS and Carleton University.

The app, called eID-me, will allow users to protect their privacy by revealing only as much information as necessary to prove their identities, Borza said. For example, the app can be set to show a cashier at the LCBO or a doorman at a bar a user’s age and photo but not his birthdate or address.

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