News / Toronto

GTA employers freezing out recent grads: Study

A diploma won't necessarily land you a job and if it does, it likely won't be full-time, according to a new report.

Employers also said they’re more likely to hire for part-time or contract positions – not permanent jobs.

torstar news service

Employers also said they’re more likely to hire for part-time or contract positions – not permanent jobs.

Feeling the job market crunch? It’s about to get worse.

Results from a recent George Brown College study show fewer employers in the GTA are looking to hire recent college or university grads. Employers also said they’re more likely to hire for part-time or contract positions – not permanent jobs.

“It’s a sign the job market is going to be much more complex and competitive,” said Debra Iafrate, the school’s career services manager.

Part of what’s driving the trend appears to be technology. According to the report, a third of all current jobs are projected to be replaced by machines over the next 15 years.

George Brown has been conducting employer research since 2008, analyzing trends in order to equip students for the modern job market. Part of that involves giving students practical experience or work placements before they graduate, Iafrate said.

“Post-secondary education will still increase your chances of getting a job but you need to do more,” she said.

Deena Ladd of Workers Action Centre said the shift towards contract work and “just in-time hiring” is hurting both workers and the economy.

“There used to be a time when employers invested time and training to develop their workforce,” she said. “Unfortunately they now seem to think it should just be provided at the drop of a hat.”

That’s not always good for business, Ladd said. Precarious positions are more likely to see higher turnover, she noted, which in turn can hamper a company’s ability to plan ahead.

“We’ve seen a complete deterioration in working conditions for the past 15 years,” she said. “This whole notion that you should just be able to click your fingers and get the person you want for the job is a complete fallacy.”

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