News / Toronto

Lower speeds, redesigned streets, stiffer penalties: Metro's action plan for Toronto's Deadly Streets

Metro has identified 3 priorities for making Toronto's streets safer: lower speed limits citywide, redesigning the worst intersection and stiffer penalties.

Metro has identified these key priorities for making Toronto’s streets safer. We’ll be pushing for measurable action on each by the end of the year.

Torstar News Service file

Metro has identified these key priorities for making Toronto’s streets safer. We’ll be pushing for measurable action on each by the end of the year.

John Tory made one of the boldest — and bravest — moves of his political career last week.

He stood up for the oft-criticized, oft-overlooked pedestrian and cyclist, vowing to set a target of zero road deaths by 2026.

Sure, the promise came the day after Metro criticized his original pitch for a 20 per cent reduction over the same timeframe. And, it was announced with a lot less gusto than he mustered for the initial plan.

But what’s important is that our mayor took the city’s pulse, realized his misstep and corrected it quickly.

It’s the kind of swift attitude adjustment that must ripple through City Hall and across every neighbourhood if we stand any chance of fixing Toronto’s deadly streets.

As debate starts Monday on the city’s proposed road safety plan, politicians can’t afford to box themselves into the same pro-car and anti-car ideological corners that have long defined this conversation.  And, we can’t afford to watch idly if they do.

Metro will continue applying the kind of pressure that forced Tory to change his stance and answer squarely to a groundswell of people for whom enough has finally become enough.

We’re asking everyone to join us in the fight by speaking out about what they see and experience on Toronto streets. Pledge to keep the conversation front and centre by sharing a selfie of your bike ride or walk to work via our #TODeadlyStreets hashtag. Metro will retweet your photos to our readers. 

Our elected leaders, meanwhile, must kick politics to the curb and make people the focus.

People like Algie Parucha, 38 — plowed down by a driver Tuesday while working at her downtown popup stall. People like Tom Samson, 35 — his wedding ring delivered to his wife in a paper bag after he was killed riding his bike to work. People like Erica Stark, 42 — killed by a driver who veered onto the sidewalk in a quiet suburban neighbourhood.

Their lives were cut short in a matter of seconds. Every second that’s spent on anything but bolstering the city’s new road safety plan is a slap in the face to the families they left behind.

More on Metronews.ca