News / Toronto

'Wardrobe malfunction' inspired R.A. Dickey's baseball look

Outfielders Kevin Pillar and Melvin Upton Jr. also go old-school with their uniform socks, but Dickey says Josh Donaldson took the look to a whole new level.

Toronto Blue Jays' Josh Donaldson runs out a foul ball against the New York Yankees in Toronto, Friday September 23, 2016. Donaldson, the reigning AL MVP, turned heads Friday when he took the field in knee-high blue socks and gleaming white spikes. The third baseman looked like he was wearing searchlights on his feet.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Mark Blinch

Toronto Blue Jays' Josh Donaldson runs out a foul ball against the New York Yankees in Toronto, Friday September 23, 2016. Donaldson, the reigning AL MVP, turned heads Friday when he took the field in knee-high blue socks and gleaming white spikes. The third baseman looked like he was wearing searchlights on his feet.

TORONTO - For Josh Donaldson, the choice to go to white hi-top shoes and knee socks was clearly planned. But for Blue Jays teammate R.A. Dickey, wearing his uniform socks knee-high on the diamond happened years ago by accident.

Donaldson, the reigning American League MVP, turned heads Friday night when he took the field against the New York Yankees combining the old and new - knee-high blue socks and gleaming white shoes that were straight off the hardwood. The third baseman looked like he was wearing searchlights on his feet.

Dickey, who wears more conventional baseball footwear, found his fashion statement by chance when he made his high school varsity baseball team in eighth grade.

“In high school you don't really get to chose your uniform, right. So the uniform I was given the pants were way too short for me, because I got to choose last because I was the youngest,” the 41-year-old knuckleballer recalled Saturday. “And so ever since then I wore them (the socks) high. And then as I got older and learned more about baseball, I really appreciated kind of the old-school way of doing things and so it just kind of fit in.

“But the genesis of that was nothing more than a wardrobe malfunction.”

Outfielders Kevin Pillar and Melvin Upton Jr. and pitcher Marco Estrada also go old-school with their uniform socks, but Dickey says the 30-year-old Donaldson, who wore the same outfit Saturday, took it to a whole new level.

“Here's what it was - it was Josh Donaldson,” Dickey said with a smile. “That's what it was.

“It was hi-top moon white shoes and high socks that exposed a gigantic calf. That's the Josh Donaldson. Only he can pull that off. Like the hi-tops and high socks, that's a terrible look normally. But he pulled it off somehow.”

And he took the Jays locker-room by surprise in the process.

“I think people were in shock,” said Dickey. “They weren't sure what they were looking at. Nobody really has the cojones to wear that outfit usually. But that's not something you have to worry about with him.”

The change seemed to work for Donaldson, who his hit 36th home run of the season in Friday's 9-0- win over the Yankees. It was just his second homer of the month.

Asked about Donaldson's unique look, manager John Gibbons said: “You mean Johnny High School?”

“It looked a little odd, the short pants,” he added. “When he turned that double play with Eddie (first baseman Edwin Encarnacion) in the seventh, it was kind of blinding when he was coming across the bag. But hey, whatever works.”

The not-for-everyone look drew mixed social media reviews.

“I hope Josh Donaldson has his best game ever today mostly because I don't want him to ever stop wearing those shoes,” said one tweet.

“If Donaldson doesn't get fined for those shoes MLB (Major League Baseball) has lost all sense of professionalism,” was another Twitter verdict.

Donaldson wears Nike shoes and the manufacturer rewarded him for his 2015 MVP season with a customized shoe, featuring his statistics engraved on the side above a gold base.

His new hi-tops also come with a dash of gold, via the Nike swoosh.

Donaldson is no stranger to changing things up. He has sported a variety of hairstyles that have ranged from a pirate to punk rock look.


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