News / Toronto

Parody condo signs ask Toronto if development has gotten out of hand

“Toronto is experiencing a massive amount of development … it feels like the process is completely out of our control."

A fake development proposal has popped up in front of Old City Hall, suggesting a 90-storey tower will be built on top of the heritage building.

CONTRIBUTED

A fake development proposal has popped up in front of Old City Hall, suggesting a 90-storey tower will be built on top of the heritage building.

Call them a sign of the times.

A group of anonymous artists have created parody versions of the city’s development proposal signs and placed them in front of prominent buildings across Toronto.

The fake proposals range from the plausible – a 30-storey residential tower adjacent to Casa Loma – to the outright ridiculous – a 40-storey condo tower appended to the top of the CN Tower, complete with parking.

In order to remain anonymous, the creators of the signs spoke with Metro via email, using local artist Daniel Rotsztain as an intermediary. They said the signs are a humorous attempt to draw attention to a serious issue that’s shaping the city.

“Toronto is experiencing a massive amount of development … it feels like the process is completely out of our control,” they said.

Another parody proposal would see this condo appended to the CN Tower

CONTRIBUTED

Another parody proposal would see this condo appended to the CN Tower

The artists insist they’re not opposed to developments or condos, just the “increasingly ludicrous” nature of some of the proposals on the market, including 65-storey condo planned at the F. W. Woolworth building near Yonge and Queen.

“We wanted to address the idea that it seems like nothing is too special to be considered for a condo development,” they said.

They also want to raise an important issue: How much is the average citizen really part of the process of city building?

“We need to have a government that reflects our values and actually listens to our ideas,” they said. “We need to hold them to that and to create effective mechanisms to develop more community space, services, affordable housing and thoughtful development in Toronto.” 

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