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Everyday Political Citizens: Emma Mogus is on a mission to export literacy

18-year-old Emma Mogus is the co-founder of Books With No Bounds, a non-profit that has sent over 200,000 books to indigenous youth around the world.

Emma Mogus, 18, is a nominee for this year’s Everyday Political Citizen Award sponsored by Samara Canada. When she was just 12 years old, she and her sister founded Books With No Bounds, a non-profit that sends books and school supplies to indigenous children around the world. Contributed

Contributed

Emma Mogus, 18, is a nominee for this year’s Everyday Political Citizen Award sponsored by Samara Canada. When she was just 12 years old, she and her sister founded Books With No Bounds, a non-profit that sends books and school supplies to indigenous children around the world. Contributed

Every year, Samara Canada’s Everyday Political Citizen project honours Canadians making positive changes in their communities. The winner of the 2016 contest will be announced Dec. 8.

Metro is profiling the seven EPC nominees in the Greater Toronto Area. Today we meet Emma Mogus, co-founder of Books With No Bounds. 

When Emma Mogus and her sister founded Books With No Bounds six years ago, they had no idea how far the journey would take them.

“We just wanted to share our love of reading and give some books to some kids,” Mogus said. “We didn’t have plans to create an international charity.”

But that’s precisely what Books With No Bounds has become. The non-profit has since shipped over 200,000 books – along with school supplies and even computers – to indigenous children around the world, including First Nations communities in Canada, as well as Uganda, parts of India and the Philippines.

Mogus has also visited First Nations reserves in Canada, and seen the struggles some are facing firsthand.

“It’s time to end the racial discrimination that still faces many indigenous people in this country,” the 18-year-old said. “When you can go to a community hours away from where you live that doesn’t have clean water, it becomes very clear that something needs to be done.”

Mogus was only 12 years old when she founded Books With No Bounds, and says the initiative might not have happened if she had listened to those who told her she couldn’t make a difference.

“Don’t be put off if someone calls you naïve,” she said, offering advice to other young people. “That was often the dialogue we received, but it didn’t stop us.”

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