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Ryerson's Digital Media Zone opening doors to general public

Incubator has been providing entrepreneurial training to students for many years, and now members of the pubic are welcome to its new community space.

Ryerson students attend a lecture by Steven Gedeon about Design Thinking and Entrepreneurship on Monday. The new space at Ryerson’s DMZ is set to welcome members of the public from all over the GTA.

Eduardo Lima / Metro Order this photo

Ryerson students attend a lecture by Steven Gedeon about Design Thinking and Entrepreneurship on Monday. The new space at Ryerson’s DMZ is set to welcome members of the public from all over the GTA.

The Digital Media Zone at Ryerson is opening its doors to the general public.

For many years serving as a hub for students to hone their creative and tech skills, the entrepreneurial incubator’s new space – called Sandbox by DMZ – aims to equip individuals of all ages with skills in design, web applications and startups.

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Executive director Abdullah Snobar said they plan to offer special programming for marginalized youth, Indigenous communities and military veterans among other groups.

“This is a space to apply and build, not a conventional way of textbook learning,” he said, noting the site can host 150 people at once.

These are some of the most in-demand programs.

Digital Discovery:

A series of workshops offered in partnership with Red Academy, offering people skills in web development, computer coding, user interface and user experience. Such programs can cost up to $10,000 elsewhere, but are free at DMZ.

Financial Literacy:

Participants learn about budgeting and saving, identifying theft, applying for grants, student loans and more. Taught by students from Ryerson’s Ted Rogers School of Management, the program has been helping Syrian newcomers currently settling in the GTA.

INK (INnovate with your Kid):

A two-hour workshop aimed at teaching cognitive and teamwork skills for children aged 8-12. Together with their parents, they learn to create, build and digitally print various objects based on the theme of the class.

The Knowledge Drop:

The program brings together talented individuals in the city’s arts community, offering hands-on classes in photography, videography and music creation and production.

Basecamp:

A summer program for high school aged youth, helping them work on a business plan, create sound strategies for startup brands, develop an app or simply turn an idea into a business ready to market.

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