News / Toronto

A look at the plan to make transit on King Street work

It would remove on-street parking and left turns, and make transit the priority.

Rendering of the city's recommended King Street pilot project.

City of Toronto

Rendering of the city's recommended King Street pilot project.

City staff is ready to unveil its plan to transform King Street into a transit corridor at a community meeting on Thursday evening. Metro took a look at a draft of the recommendation, which the public can see at 6:30 p.m. at the InterContinental Toronto Centre at 225 Front St. W.

1. WHY A TRANSIT CORRIDOR?

King is packed with transit riders. Around 65,000 people ride the King streetcar each day, more than the Sheppard subway line or Scarborough RT. But that means there’s lots of congestion — so much that it’s often faster to walk.

2. NO THROUGH TRAFFIC

In order to move streetcar riders more efficiently, cars will no longer be able to turn left between Jarvis and Bathurst, and at most major streets they won’t be able to drive through the intersection.

3. NOT ALL CARS

Taxis and delivery vehicles will still be able to get in to do their work in dedicated zones, highlighted in blue.

4. SAFER STOPS

Streetcar riders will no longer have to walk through a lane of traffic to hop on their ride.

5. MORE PUBLIC SPACE

If you need a place to sit, the city could also convert some on-street parking to public spaces, highlighted in green, which would give the corridor more of a community feel.


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