News / Toronto

City will look at 'any and all' ways to make Lake Shore and Jameson safer

The move comes after a five-year-old died at the intersection on Wednesday evening.

Police sit at the scene after a five-year-old boy was struck by a vehicle in Parkdale on Wednesday evening. Toronto police arrived near Lake Shore Blvd. W. and Jameson Ave. around 6:30 p.m.

Torstar News Service Order this photo

Police sit at the scene after a five-year-old boy was struck by a vehicle in Parkdale on Wednesday evening. Toronto police arrived near Lake Shore Blvd. W. and Jameson Ave. around 6:30 p.m.

The City of Toronto will immediately look at “any and all safety measures” to improve safety near Lake Shore Blvd. W. and Jameson Ave. following the tragic death of a five-year-old boy.

The boy was killed near the intersection Wednesday evening. He was cycling with a guardian, fell into the road at 6:20 p.m. and was hit by a 29-year-old driving a Toyota Camry. He died in hospital that night.

“It’s devastating news,” said city public works chair Jaye Robinson. “I can’t imagine what the family is going through.”

Robinson told Metro that she asked city staff first thing on Thursday morning to undertake a review and “consider any possible improvement” to the intersection.

Possibilities she mentioned for that intersection and beyond included introducing more photo radar, advanced green lights for pedestrians, and new technology that can sense when pedestrians need to cross.

Robinson added the city has “a healthy budget” to implement the Road Safety Plan, which started rolling out in earnest this January.

Pedestrian safety advocate and lawyer Patrick Brown was also shaken by the news, calling it “awfully tragic, and preventable.”

He called for a barrier to be installed immediately to protect cyclists and pedestrians on the Martin Goodman Trail from the Lake Shore, which he called a problem area.

Brown said “It was so obvious,” that this was a dangerous stretch of the typically safe Martin Goodman Trail, adding he wishes he lobbied for it before the tragedy. He also stated that the 60 km/h speed limit on Lake Shore should be lowered.

Lake Shore Boulevard was not identified as one of the city’s 2016 or 2017 priorities based on collision data from 2010 to 2016, according to Transportation Services spokesperson Steve Johnston.

He added the data “is reviewed continuously” and noted some of the ways to decrease fatalities on arterial roads include additional mid-block crosswalks, traffic signal re-timings, and more zebra pedestrian crosswalks.

Toronto Police are also conducting an investigation into the boy’s death.

By the numbers:

3: Children who have died in traffic fatalities so far this year

13: Pedestrian or cyclist fatalities in 2017

16: The number of pedestrian or cyclist fatalities at this point last year

45: Pedestrian fatalities in 2016

80: Percentage of pedestrian injuries or fatalities that occur on an arterial road, according to a 2015 Toronto Board of Health report

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