News / Toronto

Council OK's safety features for deadly East York intersection

The East York intersection where 69-year-old Jae Blue was killed in December will receive upgraded traffic control measures, like new speed bumps and a stoplight.

Ryan, left, and Scott Blue's mother, Jae Blue, was killed by a distracted driver at the intersection of Cosburn and Cedervale in December.

Eduardo Lima / Metro Order this photo

Ryan, left, and Scott Blue's mother, Jae Blue, was killed by a distracted driver at the intersection of Cosburn and Cedervale in December.

An East York neighbourhood will finally get long-requested traffic control measures.

However, the safety features only come after 69-year-old Jae Blue was killed by a driver at Cedarvale and Cosburn avenues in December.

Local councillor Janet Davis regrets the changes took so long.

"Her death was a terrible tragedy and shouldn't have happened," Davis told Metro.

Toronto-East York Community Council unanimously endorsed the package of road-safety changes at a meeting Tuesday that was attended by Blue's two sons.

Scott and Ryan Blue have both been vocal supporters of traffic-control measures in the wake of their mother's death. The package of safety measures includes new speed bumps and a stoplight, though the stoplight will have to be approved by city council on July 5.

Ryan (R) and Scott Blue have both been vocal supporters of traffic-control measures in the wake of their mother's death.

Eduardo Lima

Ryan (R) and Scott Blue have both been vocal supporters of traffic-control measures in the wake of their mother's death.

Asked if some councillors outside the Toronto-East York area might push back against the stoplight, given that staff didn't recommend it, Davis said it's a possibility.

"It wouldn't surprise me," she said, adding that she has a petition signed by hundreds of local residents to support the initiative.

Davis said the neighbourhood should be understood in a pedestrian context. She pointed to the many local amenities people walk to, including a school, child-care centre, seniors centre, skate park and baseball diamond — all of which are within one or two blocks of Woodbine Avenue, a major thoroughfare.

She argued that the larger problem is how the city determines traffic warrants, the metrics used to determine which intersections get stop signs, crosswalks and speed bumps.

"Warrants are structured in such a way to give priority to traffic flow before anything else," she said, arguing the policies should be reformed to better protect vulnerable road users like pedestrians and cyclists.

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