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Everything you wanted to know about Toronto's giant rubber duck

The duck is high maintenance. She takes two-and-a-half hours to inflate, and requires constant air from up to three pumps.

The giant rubber duck in Los Angeles.

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The giant rubber duck in Los Angeles.

Torontonians will flock this weekend to an attraction that has no relationship to Canada Day at all: a giant rubber duck.

Whether people are drawn by the idea that the massive toy bird figuratively transforms Toronto Harbour into a giant bathtub or the novelty of a record-setting duck, its call beckons.

Here are eight things to know about the plus-sized mallard:

  • Because it's a maritime vessel, the duck receives "she" or "her" pronouns.
  • The duck is actually something of a fake. She is a facsimilie of a project by Dutch artist Florentijn Hofman that has been underway for more than a decade. This duck has been around since 2014.
  • The duck is big. She is six storeys, which is tall enough to require a zoning variance in most Toronto neighbourhoods. Along with the supporting barge that makes the duck float, she weighs 30,000 pounds.
  • This duck, created by Ohio public relations specialist Ryan Whaley, is the world's biggest–just a few feet taller than Hofman's. As Whaley told Metro, when you make a giant duck, it may as well set the record.
  • The duck is high maintenance. She takes two-and-a-half hours to inflate, and requires constant air from up to three pumps. Sometimes there's a worker inside the inflated duck to maintain the pump; there is a giant zipper entrance in the duck's butt.
  • The duck requires eight to 10 people to manage, unload and inflate it. The duck also requires a crane to remove it from its transport truck.
  • It cost $120,000 to bring the giant duck to the Redpath Waterfront Festival, which pays for things like transportation and maintenance. Whaley says that the cost to initially build the duck was $150,000.
  • The duck can be seen for free from July 1 to 3 at HtO Park along the waterfront. The duck will then make her way to Owen Sound, Sault Ste. Marie and Midland.

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