News / Toronto

Missing: Community bike stolen from charity

Scarborough cycling charity searches for a do-gooder bike after alleged theft.

This three-speed bike was allegedly stolen from the Scarborough Cycles facility on Wednesday. The program, which works to promote cycling in the area, is hoping the city's active cycling community can help retrieve the bike.

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This three-speed bike was allegedly stolen from the Scarborough Cycles facility on Wednesday. The program, which works to promote cycling in the area, is hoping the city's active cycling community can help retrieve the bike.

A do-gooder bike is gone after an alleged theft from a Scarborough cycling charity on Wednesday.

Scarborough Cycles promotes bike culture in the suburbs by offering DIY bike repair, guided rides like this summer's Tour de Scarborough, and access to bikes at two community hubs on the city's east end.

But one of the bikes it typically lends to locals, staff and volunteers went missing from the organization's Danforth location at some point on Wednesday, Marvin Macaraig coordinator for the program told Metro.

"It’s really crummy," Macaraig said, noting bike theft is a sad fact of life for many Toronto cyclists.

He hopes the city's active cycling community will feel sympathy and help track down the white three-speed Simcoe.

“Somewhere, somehow, someone will see it," he said.

The group recorded the bike's serial number and plans to share it with police. It's something Toronto police Const. David Hopkinson says improves the chances of recovery and is a quick task he "100 per cent" recomends all bike owners do. (The TPS offers a registration form on its website.)

Hopkinson added having eyes in the community is a big help when tracking down stolen bikes and urged anyone who spots it to call police.

The charity purchased most of its fleet thanks to donations and grants. This is the first bike to go missing in two years. But with limited funds Macaraig said they don't have the budget to replace it at the moment.

"It means that one less person will be able to participate in our group rides," he said, adding the setback won't put the group off its larger goals of removing barriers to cycling for the people who use their services, everyone from newcomers to long-time city cyclists.

When it comes to the chances the bike will be returned, he remains hopeful. It has a distinct look and is covered in Scarborough Cycles stickers.

“I’m always optimistic," he said. “Weirder things have happened.”

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