News / Toronto

Giant rubber duck proved to be an economic boon, festival says

People celebrate Canada Day near the giant inflatable duck that sits on Toronto's Harbourfront on Saturday, July 1, 2017. A Toronto waterfront festival that hosted an unexpectedly controversial giant rubber duck says it generated millions of dollars in economic activity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

People celebrate Canada Day near the giant inflatable duck that sits on Toronto's Harbourfront on Saturday, July 1, 2017. A Toronto waterfront festival that hosted an unexpectedly controversial giant rubber duck says it generated millions of dollars in economic activity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

TORONTO — A Toronto waterfront festival that hosted an unexpectedly controversial giant rubber duck says it generated millions of dollars in economic activity.

The Redpath Waterfront Festival says a study conducted by Enigma Research shows the economic impact of the festival was a record $7.6 million.

About 750,000 people attended, which the festival attributes in part to the attraction billed as the world's largest rubber duck.

The six-storey, 13,600-kilogram yellow duck was brought to Toronto by the festival at a total cost of $200,000.

The Ontario government gave the festival an approximately $120,000 grant, which Opposition politicians called a "cluster duck" and an absurd use of taxpayer dollars.

The festival says area businesses reported record sales over that Canada Day weekend and that water taxis received a boost in business after a challenging summer due to Toronto island closures.

 

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