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Everything to know about the Toronto Zoo's latest bundle of joy — Baby rhino

He weighed in at 137 pounds and already has hairy ears. You can expect him to get a lot bigger.

The Toronto Zoo is proud to announce that Zohari, a seven-year-old female white rhinoceros, gave birth to a male calf on Christmas Eve.

Courtesy / Toronto Zoo

The Toronto Zoo is proud to announce that Zohari, a seven-year-old female white rhinoceros, gave birth to a male calf on Christmas Eve.

The Toronto Zoo's newest resident, a white rhino calf, arrived on Christmas Eve — just in time for a holiday photo-op with his mom Zohari. Here's everything you need to know about the baby and white rhinos in general.

Born to be big

Baby yet-to-be-named weighs in at 137 pounds and already has hairy ears, zoo staff say. You can expect him to get a lot bigger. According to the World Wildlife Fund, white rhinos are the second largest land mammals on earth after elephants. Adult males can grow to1.85 m in height and 3.6 tonnes. Females can weigh as much as 1.7 tonnes.

A coup for conservation

White rhinos were once almost extinct. Conservation efforts have helped, but a rise in poaching has put them at risk once again. They are listed as near threatened on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. There are between 19,682 and 21,077 white rhinos left in the wild, says the Toronto Zoo.

Far from home

Almost all white rhinos live in one of four countires: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe and Kenya. The new little guy has a couple counterparts in other zoos, though, should they ever organize an intercontinental playdate. Other white rhinos were born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park (April 2016) and Singapore Zoo (September 2017).

A long wait

White rhinos are pregnant for about 16 months, almost twice the length of a human pregnancy. They typically have two to three years between calfs, says the World Wildlife Fund.

Know your rhinos

The white rhino, in case you were wondering, is physically distinct from the black rhino. White rhinos are bigger, with more of a shoulder hump, and a square lip as opposed to a hooked upper lip, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

Editor's Note: An earlier version of this story omitted the word land from the statement that white rhinos are the second largest land mammals on earth.

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