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Toronto to Pyeongchang: Five hometown athletes to watch at the 2018 Olympic Games

Metro's got you covered with not only who to watch at this year's Games, but also where to watch.

Candace Crawford started skiing at age two and by seven she was already racing.

Jonathan Hayward / The Canadian Press

Candace Crawford started skiing at age two and by seven she was already racing.

More than 200 athletes are representing Canada at this year's Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. If you're looking for the next Penny Oleksiak to cheer for, keep an eye on these athletes from Toronto and Markham:

Name: Candace Crawford Age: 23 Sport: Alpine Skiing

She started skiing at age two, and by seven she was already racing. She earned her first World Cup points in 2014. Her brother Jack Crawford is a member of the same team. Favourite quote: “If everything seems under control, you’re just not going fast enough.” – Mario Andretti.

Name: Andrew Poje Age: 30 Sport: Figure Skating

Poje partnered with Kaitlyn Weaver to win silver in 2014 and bronze in 2015.

JONATHAN HAYWARD / The Canadian Press

Poje partnered with Kaitlyn Weaver to win silver in 2014 and bronze in 2015.

Poje took up figure skating as a happy accident, as he spent time at the rink while his mother and sister were enrolled in classes. He’s partnered with Kaitlyn Weaver to win silver in 2014 and bronze in 2015. His secret: He always drinks coconut water before competing.

Name: Chris Kelly Age: 37 Sport: Ice Hockey

Drafted 94th overall by the Ottawa Senators in 1999, Kelly was instrumental in the team’s appearance at the Stanley Cup Finals in 2007.

Melanie Duchene / The Canadian Press

Drafted 94th overall by the Ottawa Senators in 1999, Kelly was instrumental in the team’s appearance at the Stanley Cup Finals in 2007.

Drafted 94th overall by the Ottawa Senators in 1999, he was instrumental in the team’s appearance at the Stanley Cup Finals in 2007. They lost, but he would later win the Cup with the Boston Bruins in 2011. Kelly has played a total of 833 NHL games. For the 2017-2018 season, he tried out unsuccessfully for the Edmonton Oilers. He now plays with the Senators’ developmental league in Belleville.

Name: Phylicia George Age: 30 Sport: Bobsleigh

George started her career by racing her dad in parking lots, and by age 15 she was already running hurdles.

Sebastian Kahnert / The Associated Press

George started her career by racing her dad in parking lots, and by age 15 she was already running hurdles.

She started her career by racing her dad in parking lots, and by age 15 she was already running hurdles. The Markham resident is a veteran Olympian, having competed in track-and-field at London 2012 and Rio 2016. She has a biological science degree from the University of Connecticut. Her inspiration: Muhammed Ali.

Name: Calynn Irwin Age: 28 Sport: Snowboarding

Irwin was just 16 when she made her World Cup debut.

Torstar News Service

Irwin was just 16 when she made her World Cup debut.

Irwin comes from a skiing family; her parents wouldn’t let her snowboard until she was eight. She was just 16 when she made her World Cup debut. A concussion in 2006 took her away from competition for two years. She’s currently taking classic and ancient studies at Queen’s University. She always travels with her stuffed polar bear, Paul.

Where to watch:

The 14-hour time difference between Olympics host Pyeongchang and Toronto makes it difficult to watch some events live. But here are a few suggestions on where to go:

CBC Atrium: The downtown Toronto office of the Olympics’ official broadcaster will be open for the public to watch the Games every day from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. A public viewing party takes place Friday morning.

Eaton Centre: Cadillac Fairview will provide live streaming of the Games in all 19 of its malls across the country, including a hub inside Eaton Centre.

TD Centre: A viewing lounge has been created in the atrium of TD Centre on Wellington Street. All events will be live streamed on big screens.

Your bar of choice: The City of Toronto has passed legislation allowing licensed bars and restaurants to start serving alcohol at 7 a.m. ET on Feb. 19, 23 and 24, when the semifinal and final men's and women's hockey games will be played.

With files from The Canadian Press

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