News / Vancouver

Sedin brothers fund program for at-risk Surrey children

Vancouver Canucks players Henrik and Daniel Sedin are funding an out-of-school program for 150 at-risk children at three Surrey schools.

Henrik Sedin, left, and his twin brother Daniel Sedin skate during team practice in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 12, 2011.

Darryl Dyck/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Henrik Sedin, left, and his twin brother Daniel Sedin skate during team practice in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 12, 2011.

The Vancouver Canucks’ Sedin twins are giving at-risk children in Surrey a shot at after school activities their families couldn’t otherwise afford.

Henrik and Daniel Sedin will fund an out-of-school program called Clubhouse 36 at three Surrey schools for about 150 vulnerable students between six and 12 years old, the brothers announced in a news release Monday.

The program, which costs about $200,000 per year to run, has enough funding to last for three years. Run by Surrey Schools and the YMCA of Greater Vancouver, it offers programming two afternoons a week and full-day programming during spring and summer breaks.

Henrik Sedin celebrates a win during a gaga ball game at Holly Elementary School in Surrey on Sept. 14, 2015.

Courtesy Jeff Vinnick Images

Henrik Sedin celebrates a win during a gaga ball game at Holly Elementary School in Surrey on Sept. 14, 2015.

During the pilot at Holly Elementary, Lena Shaw Elementary and Georges Vanier Elementary schools this summer, kids – many who had never seen the ocean before, according to the news release – got the chance to learn about fishing, archery, golf, science and arts, among other things. They also went on field trips to places including the aquarium and zoo. 

All of their parents said the program sparked their children’s interest in new activities and three quarters said they noticed positive changes in their children’s attitudes or behaviours.

Other donors to the program include Westland Insurance, the Robert L. Conconi Foundation, Bosa Properties Foundation, BMO and Canucks for Kids Fund.

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