News / Vancouver

Vancouver to hold Indigenous arts festival for Canada’s 150th birthday

The City of Vancouver aims to hold an 11-day, $7.75-million festival in honour of Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017.

A Canadian fan celebrates his team's first goal during the Men's Gold Medal Hockey match between USA and Canada at the Canada Hockey Place during the XXI Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver on February 28, 2010.

YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images

A Canadian fan celebrates his team's first goal during the Men's Gold Medal Hockey match between USA and Canada at the Canada Hockey Place during the XXI Winter Olympic Games in Vancouver on February 28, 2010.

Vancouver councillors approved a plan to host an 11-day, $7.75-million festival celebrating Indigenous culture in honour of Canada’s 150th birthday in summer 2017.

Council voted in favour of dedicating $1.9 million to “The Drum Is Calling” festival in a bid to get the federal government and private sponsors to fork over the rest of the cash.

The event, which will be held in partnership with the local Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, intends to contribute to reconciliation and build stronger relationships with Indigenous people. Organizers also hope it will position Vancouver as Canada’s primary Aboriginal cultural tourism destination.  

The festival will be held at downtown Vancouver’s Larwill Park, the site of the 2010 Winter Olympics live site, the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup fan zone and the future home of the Vancouver Art Gallery. It will also include the Salish Sea Paddling Together Canoe Journey, a Walk for Reconciliation and an All Nations Gathering.