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Vancouver start up makes 3D printing replicas of famous paintings possible

Even micro cracks and brushstroke textures are captured in the recreations

Paul Lindahl, CEO of Arius Technology, stands next to a 3D printed version of Van Gogh’s Bowl of Zinnias and Other Flowers and the 3D scanner that scanned the priceless original to make the recreation possible.

Jennifer Gauthier/Metro

Paul Lindahl, CEO of Arius Technology, stands next to a 3D printed version of Van Gogh’s Bowl of Zinnias and Other Flowers and the 3D scanner that scanned the priceless original to make the recreation possible.

A Vancouver start up has found a way to recreate iconic paintings from Van Gogh and Monet right down to the individual ridges made by their brush strokes.

Arius Technology scans the artwork to create a 3D file of the piece and sends it to the Netherlands where a 3D printer prints an exact replicate on an aluminum sheet. Then the recreation is framed before it is sent to consumers around the world for their homes. The project is called Verus Art.

It’s a game-changer for art lovers, said Paul Lindahl, CEO of Arius Technology.

“We’re able to replicate the brushwork and recreate the original to the point where it is virtually impossible to tell the difference,” he told Metro.

“In the past, reproductions have been flat. We’ve brought it now to 3D.”

The 3D scanner is designed to handle priceless works of art and captures even minute details, down to ten microns, which is a tenth the width of a human hair.

“If there is a micro crack in the art, there would be a micro crack in the reproduction.”

This 3D scanner from Arius Technology creates digital files of priceless works of art without damaging them.

Jennifer Gauthier/Metro

This 3D scanner from Arius Technology creates digital files of priceless works of art without damaging them.

But artists don’t need to worry that these recreations could be passed off as originals because although there is virtually no difference when the painting is framed, its aluminum backing is a dead giveaway, said Lindahl.

Verus Art recently launched its recreation of artwork from Canada’s National Gallery. Art fans can now buy replicas of Cézanne’s work for their living rooms.

“Its about bringing art to the people, including to their homes,” said Lindahl, who has a Monet recreation above his fireplace.

The recreations aren’t cheap – pieces go for anywhere from $650 to more than $6,650.

Verus Art is in talks with other museums to expand its collection, according to Lindahl.

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