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UBC and University of Washington partnership aims to make new Silicon Valley

The $1 M collaboration was made possible by a donation form tech giant Microsoft

UBC wants to help make the Pacific Northwest the next Silicon Valley with a new data centre.

The Canadian Press

UBC wants to help make the Pacific Northwest the next Silicon Valley with a new data centre.

UBC and the University of Washington have partnered to create a new data centre with the aim of finding solutions for everything from transit to food safety.

The $1 million Cascadia Urban Analytics Cooperative is funded by Microsoft, making it the largest industry-funded research partnership between the two universities.

“Thanks to this generous gift from Microsoft, our two universities are poised to help transform the Cascadia region into a technological hub comparable to Silicon Valey and Boston,” said UBC’s president, Santa J. Ono.

“This new partnership transcends borders and strives to unleash our collective brain power, to bring about economic growth that enriches the lives of Canadians and Americans as well as urban communities throughout the world.”

The centre will encourage sustained collaboration between researchers and professionals on both sides of the border, according to a UBC written release.

The cooperative will revolve around these four programs:

The Cascadia Data Science for Social Good Summer Program

A joint summer program for UW and UBC students where they work on data projects that benefit urban communities.

Cascadia Data Science for Social Good Scholar Symposium

A program for scholars from the two universities to collaborate on technology-driven projects.

Sustained Research Partnerships

This program will provide funding, technical expertise and networking for researchers and professionals with the aim of making the Pacific Northwest a hub for urban analytics.

Responsible Data Management System and Services

This program will develop new software, systems, and services to ensure projects are fair, accountable, and transparent.

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