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Throne speech signals hope for B.C.’s younger generations: lobby

Generation Squeeze applauds NDP's housing and childcare priorities

Paul Kershaw is a University of British Columbia professor at the School of Population and Health and the founder of Generation Squeeze, a coalition of young Canadians tackling generational inequality.

Jennifer Gauthier / For Metro

Paul Kershaw is a University of British Columbia professor at the School of Population and Health and the founder of Generation Squeeze, a coalition of young Canadians tackling generational inequality.

An advocacy group for Canadians in their 20s, 30s, and 40s,  – dubbed Generation Squeeze – is applauding the new B.C. NDP government’s promises of affordable housing and childcare policies.
 
Soaring costs in those two areas, along with postsecondary education tuitions, are preventing today’s younger generations from achieving the same standard of living their parents did, according to Generation Squeeze.
 
The organization’s founder, Paul Kershaw, characterized the throne speech as a “renewed reason for hope among B.C.’s younger generations.”
 
The UBC professor also applauded the government’s commitment to prioritize affordable housing over attracting investors to the real estate market.
 
The throne speech also mentioned renters will receive better protection against abuse and large rent increases. However it did not mention the $400 renter rebate featured on the NDP’s platform during the election.
 
Similarly, while the throne speech emphasized Premier John Horgan’s commitment to create a universal childcare system, it did not specify what the fee would be for families. Generation Squeeze and others are advocating for a $10-per-day policy.
 
“That plan could save young families tens of thousands of dollars before their children reach grade school – funds they could use to pay down student debt, pay rent, save for home, or put money aside for retirement,” Generation Squeeze said in a statement.
 
The B.C. government is set to table a budget update Monday that will establish in more detail which policies will take top priority.
 
“All British Columbians must wait to see what actually gets prioritized in the budget update, and the next full budget scheduled for February,” said Kershaw.

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