News / Winnipeg

Feminist, folk and the '40s: Rosie and the Riveters drop f-words

The 1940s-inspired feminist band will stop by The Park Theatre.

The Riveters, a folk band from Saskatoon, Sask., take their inspiration from feminist icon Rosie the Riveter.

Supplied/Lisa Landrie

The Riveters, a folk band from Saskatoon, Sask., take their inspiration from feminist icon Rosie the Riveter.

Rosie and the Riveters are coming to Winnipeg for some good, clean fun – with an f-word thrown in.

The folk band with 1940s flair consider themselves to be a feminist group, choosing to sing about what they love rather than heartbreak and donating 20 per cent of their merchandise sales to women working to better their communities around the globe.

“There’s a strong consciousness coming towards what feminism really is and that’s that men and women are equal and deserve the same equal opportunities,” said Allyson Reigh, one of the four band members.

She admits that sometimes people are put off by the Riveters using “the f-word” to define themselves.

Since the four current members came together in 2011, they have performed more than 150 shows across Canada and the United States. They’ve also been showcased in several events, including Folk Alliance International, JunoFest and Folk Music Canada.

Now, they’re touring to promote their album, Good Clean Fun.

Despite their growing popularity, Reigh said she still considers fellow Riveters Alexis Normand, Melissa Nygren and Farideh Olsen to be friends before they’re bandmates and business partners.

“It’s really joyful being up on stage with four other really great musicians and strong women and strong friends,” Reigh said.

Olsen thinks the audience can feel this.

“We definitely see people cry. We see people laugh. I mean, our whole intention is that people come into the show and they leave a little lighter,” Olsen said.

One of the highlights of 2016 so far for Reigh was performing at the Winnipeg Folk Festival, so she’s excited to come back to Manitoba for a show at The Park Theatre on Nov. 29.

Tickets are $20 through myparktheatre.com and at Music Trader.

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