News / Winnipeg

New pathway connects Point Douglas to The Forks, downtown

A new trail along the Red River that connects Point Douglas to The Forks was opened Monday, while workers also started clearing the river walk further south.

The Forks North Portage CEO Paul Jordan and Eileen Clarke, Minister of Indigenous and Municipal relations opened a new 'Go to the Waterfront' project trail that connects Point Douglas to The Forks.

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The Forks North Portage CEO Paul Jordan and Eileen Clarke, Minister of Indigenous and Municipal relations opened a new 'Go to the Waterfront' project trail that connects Point Douglas to The Forks.

Cyclists and pedestrians can finally use a pathway between Point Douglas and The Forks.

The Forks’ reopened the south Point Douglas trail on Tuesday. With $418,000 worth of repair work for the "Go to the Waterfront" project, the path now includes lighting to extend hours of use. 

It was also widened to allow active travellers to pass one another safely, and seating was added to the trail.

Paul Jordan, CEO of The Forks North Portage, told media gathered at the trail’s ribbon cutting that the “very small, little boutique project” was a long time in the making.

The Manitoba Recreational Trails Association first identified it as a vital connection 17 years ago in 2000, the Winnipeg Trails Association put it in its top-five priority list in 2006, and The Forks has had it on its radar since doing the same when identifying priorities for its ‘Go to the Waterfront’ project in 2014.

“Finally it’s here,” Jordan said.

He explained that with the new pathway filling a pre-existing trail gap, a cyclist could feasibly travel all the way “from the Bridge Drive-In to Birds Hill Provincial Park in an active transportation corridor.”

Further south along the Red River, Parks Canada officially began work Monday clearing an estimated 900 cubic metres of silt and debris from an impassable section of the river walk near The Forks.

External Relations Manager David Elias said it may seem late to be starting such work, but crews were on site “earlier than we have (seen) in the past five years.”

Typically, he said the river walk isn’t cleared at that section until July 10, but he said there’s extra pressure to get it done early “because it’s Canada 150.”

“Work can take anywhere from two-to-three weeks,” he added.

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