News / Winnipeg

Theatre of the mind: Auditory experience comes to Winnipeg

Calgary’s Ghost River Theatre, in partnership with Theatre Projects Manitoba, teamed up to bring the experience to Winnipeg.

Sound designer Matthew Waddell and artistic director Eric Rose in Ghost River Theatre's auditory experience Tomorrow's Child.

Laura Anzola/Supplied

Sound designer Matthew Waddell and artistic director Eric Rose in Ghost River Theatre's auditory experience Tomorrow's Child.

There’s a new play in Winnipeg to see—or not.

The blindfolded auditory experience, Tomorrow’s Child, is an adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s sci-fi short story about two new parents and their child—who is born into the fourth dimension and appears as a blue pyramid.

Calgary’s Ghost River Theatre, in partnership with Theatre Projects Manitoba, teamed up to bring the experience to Winnipeg.

“That fact that people are blindfolded doesn’t mean they’re not seeing… painting imagery with the imaginative resources inside of them and their experience from their personal memory bank of people,” said the play’s artistic director Eric Rose, who developed the experience along with Matthew Waddell.

“This is what I call an internal spectacle, it’s something you get to create and cast, while you’re listening,” he said.

He added that Tomorrow’s Child isn’t like listening to a radio play, as it brings a “wide palette of sound.”

Listeners are led blindfolded into the space, where they sit in swivel chairs—which Rose says gives them more agency in the experience.  

Though the sightless theatre project has made its way across Canada, this the first time it landed in Winnipeg.

Theatre Projects Manitoba says it is able to accommodate members of the deaf and hard of hearing communities, and blind or visually impaired audience members by offering complimentary companion tickets.

Tomorrow’s Child is part of Ghost River Theatre’s Six Senses Performance Series, which explores the boundaries of stimulating an audience’s senses.

Tomorrow’s Child will be at the West End Cultural Centre until Nov. 5.

More on Metronews.ca