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Emma Watson calls out sexual violence on campuses in UN speech

The UN Women goodwill ambassador is calling on universities and colleges to confront sexual assault on their campuses.

UN Women's Goodwill Ambassador, actress Emma Watson speaks during a press conference to launch of the campaign 'HeForShe' at the United Nations Headquarters on the sidelines of the 71st UN General Assembly in New York on September 20, 2016.

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UN Women's Goodwill Ambassador, actress Emma Watson speaks during a press conference to launch of the campaign 'HeForShe' at the United Nations Headquarters on the sidelines of the 71st UN General Assembly in New York on September 20, 2016.

In her second speech to the United Nations, Emma Watson is calling on universities and colleges to change the way they deal with sexual violence on their campuses.

The actress and UN Women goodwill ambassador made the speech introducing an initiative from HeForShe.

"What if, as is the case in far too many universities, we're given the message that sexual violence isn't actually a form of violence?" she says.

Her opening comments were in introduction of UN Women's HeForShe IMPACT 10X10X10 University Parity Report, where leaders of 10 universities lay out commitments to achieving gender parity.

Though Watson touches on the importance of women in leadership roles in universities, her comments on sexual violence are the focus of her remarks.

Universities "must make it clear that the safety of women, minorities and anyone who may be vulnerable is a right, not a privilege," she says. "A right that will be respected by a community that believes and supports survivors."

The English actress' remarks come at a pressing time for universities, increasingly in the spotlight for their handling of sexual assaults.

Not only in the U.S., where Stanford University's response to Brock Turner's rape conviction was to ban booze at parties, but also in Canada.

The University of British Columbia is the subject of a human rights complaint that alleges the school didn't act after multiple women reported being sexually assaulted by a PhD student.

A recent report into the university's sexual assault policy called for a complete overhaul of its system.