News / World

The Latest: Demonstrators stay out past Charlotte curfew

In this image taken from video recorded by Keith Lamont Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, Charlotte police squat next to Keith Lamont Scott as Scott lies face-down on the ground, in Charlotte, N.C. In the video of the deadly encounter between Charlotte police and the black man, Rakeyia Scott repeatedly tells officers her husband is not armed and pleads with them not to shoot him as they shout at him to drop a gun. The video does not show clearly whether Scott had a gun. (Rakeyia Scott/Curry Law Firm via AP)

In this image taken from video recorded by Keith Lamont Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott, on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016, Charlotte police squat next to Keith Lamont Scott as Scott lies face-down on the ground, in Charlotte, N.C. In the video of the deadly encounter between Charlotte police and the black man, Rakeyia Scott repeatedly tells officers her husband is not armed and pleads with them not to shoot him as they shout at him to drop a gun. The video does not show clearly whether Scott had a gun. (Rakeyia Scott/Curry Law Firm via AP)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Latest on unrest in Charlotte after the shooting of a black man by police (all times local):

12:05 a.m.

A curfew has taken effect for a second night in Charlotte with demonstrators still on the street.

Dozens of protesters continued to march in the city's business district past the midnight Friday curfew into early Saturday.

Police said they would take a similar approach to Thursday night, when they allowed demonstrators to stay out past the curfew as long as they were peaceful.

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10:45 p.m.

Among the National Guard troops and Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officers patrolling the downtown streets was a Greensboro church choir literally sounding a call for peace.

A choir from the Citadel Church in Greensboro took over a street corner and began two hours of singing spirituals Friday night, drawing a crowd of clergy and curious onlookers who were moved enough by the songs to clap along.

The Rev. Gregory Drumwright directed the choir of approximately two dozen. He says the church membership is made up mostly of students from colleges in the Greensboro area, about 70 miles northeast of Charlotte.

Drumwright and his parishioners were dressed in white. He said that was because they wanted to be lights and "vessels of peace, vessels of righteousness, not rage."

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10 p.m.

Hillary Clinton's campaign says she has decided to postpone her planned trip to Charlotte, North Carolina, on Sunday after hearing from community leaders.

Clinton announced earlier Friday that she would travel to Charlotte in the aftermath of the shooting of a black man by a Charlotte police officer.

But Clinton's campaign now says that after further discussions with community leaders, the Democratic presidential nominee will postpone the trip to avoid straining the city's resources.

Clinton's decision came after Charlotte Mayor Jennifer Roberts told CNN that Clinton should postpone her visit because the city's security resources were stretched thin.

Clinton now plans to visit Charlotte on Oct. 2.

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8:45 p.m.

Hundreds of people are marching in downtown Atlanta to protest the recent fatal shootings of two black men by police.

Marchers took to the streets after a rally at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights museum Friday evening. Many held signs reading "Black Lives Matter" and chanted "We're ready, we're ready for y'all."

NAACP state President Francys Johnson and lawyer Mawuli Mel Davis led the protest. No police were present, but volunteers walked ahead of demonstrators and blocked off intersections for marchers.

The peaceful march in Atlanta comes after 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by an officer in Charlotte this week. In Oklahoma, 40-year-old Terence Crutcher was shot to death by Tulsa Officer Betty Shelby.

Shelby is charged with first-degree manslaughter.

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8:30 p.m.

Dozens of demonstrators are out in Charlotte for a fourth night of protests after the shooting of a black man by a police officer.

Several dozen people gathered Friday night at a park and then marched through Charlotte's business district with signs.

One marcher had a sign that said "Just Stop The Killing," while another had a banner that said "Just Release the Tapes." Protesters have sought the release of police footage of the shooting earlier this week of Keith Lamont Scott by a police officer.

They were watched by National Guard members posted in front of many downtown buildings.

Three previous nights of protests included two that were chaotic. But Thursday, people marched through downtown in a largely peaceful protest.

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8:15 p.m.

A downtown Charlotte hotel is sending its guests to other hotels in anticipation of a night of protests over the shooting death of a black man by a police officer.

WBTV in Charlotte (http://bit.ly/2cNY8rd) quoted an Aloft at EpiCentre employee as saying guests were being moved to other hotels Friday to "comply" with Charlotte-Mecklenburg police, adding that the safety of guests is important. The employee also said the hotel wants to "protect our community."

An employee contacted by The Associated Press referred all calls to sales and marketing director Chuck Gardner, who couldn't be reached for comment Friday night.

The EpiCentre complex hosts the Aloft hotel, bars, restaurants and businesses. Several businesses there were damaged Wednesday when protests over the death of Keith Lamont Scott turned violent.

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8 p.m.

The mayor of Charlotte is urging Hillary Clinton to postpone her announced visit to the embattled North Carolina city.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts told CNN on Friday that the Democratic presidential nominee should hold off coming to Charlotte and let the city recuperate from days of protest after the shooting of a black man by police.

Clinton's campaign said earlier in the day that she would travel to Charlotte on Sunday, one day before her first high-profile debate with Republican Donald Trump. Her campaign did not immediately release details of her visit to Charlotte.

Clinton also said police video of the fatal shooting should be released immediately.

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7 p.m.

An attorney for the family of a black man shot by Charlotte police says his clients decided to release cellphone video recorded by the victim's wife as part of their quest for truth.

Charles Monnett said in a statement Friday that the family of Keith Lamont Scott still wants Charlotte officials to publicly release all video of the encounter "so that people can draw their own conclusions" about his death.

Monnett encourages the public to reserve judgment until all facts are known. He says the family continues to ask for peace in Charlotte.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney says there is footage from at least one police body camera and one dashboard camera. He has so far declined to release that video.

The video recorded by Rakeyia Scott does not show whether Scott had a gun.

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5 p.m.

The mother of a black man killed by Charlotte police asks protesters to "give up the rioting" because it's worsened the situation.

The mother of Keith Lamont Scott told WCSC TV of Charleston, South Carolina, (http://bit.ly/2cWsNDF ) that he would not want the violence that followed his death Tuesday. Vernita Scott Walker of James Island says a peaceful walk is fine, but the rioting and looting "makes it bad for the family."

A third night of protests Thursday in Charlotte lacked the violence and property damage of previous nights.

Walker says she last talked to her son less than two hours before the shooting. She says she learned of his death from TV news.

Police say Scott was armed, but witnesses say he held only a book. His mother says it was the Qur’an , which he loved to read daily.

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2:30 p.m.

An attorney for the family of the black man shot by Charlotte police says newly released video recorded by the victim's wife does not prove whether the shooting was justified.

Instead, Justin Bamberg tells The New York Times (http://nyti.ms/2daBBaR), the video shows "another vantage point" of the incident, in which 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot. Bamberg says he hopes Charlotte police release their own videos of the shooting. They've so far refused to do so. Police Chief Kerr Putney says there's at least one video from a body camera and one from a dashboard camera.

The police video could resolve wildly different accounts of the shooting.

Police have said Scott refused repeated commands to drop a gun; residents say he was unarmed. It's unclear from the video shot by Scott's wife whether he had a weapon.

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2:30 p.m.

North Carolina's attorney general is calling on Charlotte officials to release police video of the shooting of a man by an officer this week.

In a statement from his campaign office Friday morning, the Democratic gubernatorial candidate says one way to pursue truth in the shooting of 43-yea-rold Keith Lamont Scott would be to release the videos to the public.

Scott was shot Tuesday afternoon by a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer.

Police Chief Kerr Putney has refused to release the videos from at least one body camera and one dashboard camera, saying it could jeopardize the investigation. The State Bureau of Investigation has taken over the case.

Cooper says releasing the video would help bring the community and law enforcement together.

Cooper faces Republican Gov. Pat McCrory in November.

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1:35 p.m.

In new video, the body of the man killed by Charlotte police can be seen on the ground, where officers appear to try to attend to him, but his actual shooting isn't shown.

The video, recorded by 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott's wife, recorded it.

Officers tell Scott to drop a gun, but it's unclear from the footage whether he has a weapon. Police have said he was armed, but witnesses say he held only a book.

In the video, Rakeyia Scott tells officers her husband doesn't have a gun, has a traumatic brain injury and won't hurt them. She says, "Keith, don't let them break the windows" as she urges him to exit his car. She further tells him, "don't do it," but it's not clear exactly what she means.

After the shooting, she tells officers "I'm not coming near you. I'm going to record though."

Scott's body is face down, and it's unclear whether the officers are trying to help him or check for a weapon.

She states the address and says: "These are the police officers that shot my husband."

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1:10 p.m.

The New York Times has posted video of the deadly encounter involving police and a black man who was shot by an officer in Charlotte.

The video, posted on the newspaper's website Friday, was recorded by the wife of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott. The 2 1/2 minute video does not show the shooting, though gunshots can be heard. Before gunfire erupts, police repeatedly tell Scott to drop a gun.

His wife tells officers at the scene repeatedly that he doesn't have a gun and that he has a traumatic brain injury. At one point, she tells him to get out of the car so that police don't break the windows. As the encounter escalates, she tells them repeatedly: "You better not shoot him."

After the gunshots are heard, Scott can be seen laying on the ground while his wife says "he better live."

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11:35 a.m.

Charlotte's police chief says there is at least one video from a body camera and one other video from a dashboard camera that captured the deadly shooting of a black man by an officer.

But Chief Kerr Putney continued Friday to refuse to release the video, which could resolve wildly different accounts of the shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott.

Police have said Scott refused repeated commands to drop a gun; residents say he was unarmed. An attorney for his family, who viewed the video Thursday, says it's not clear from the video if he's holding anything, including a gun.

Putney said during a news conference Friday that he cannot release more information about the shooting because his department is not leading the investigation, which is being conducted by the State Bureau of Investigation.

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11:25 a.m.

Charlotte's mayor says she does believe video of the police shooting of a black man should be released publicly, but she says it's a matter of when.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts said during a news conference Friday that "I do believe the video should be released. The question is on the timing." Police Chief Kerr Putney echoed her remarks, saying the video's release is "a matter of when, it's a matter of sequence."

Protesters and the family of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott have called on authorities to release the video, which could resolve wildly different accounts of Scott's shooting.

Police have said Scott refused repeated commands to drop a gun; residents say he was unarmed. An attorney for his family, who viewed the video Thursday, says it's not clear from the video if he's holding anything, including a gun.

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11:20 a.m.

Police say they have arrested a suspect in the deadly shooting of a protester during demonstrations in Charlotte over an officer's killing of a black man.

Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney said during a news conference that the suspect was arrested Friday morning. He provided few other details about the arrest or the suspect but said that video led investigators to the shooter.

The protester was shot Wednesday night during a violent night of protests in Charlotte. Officials have since implemented a curfew that runs from midnight-6 a.m. They also have called in state troopers and the National Guard in an effort to maintain order. After two nights of unrest, Putney says Thursday night's protests were relatively peaceful.

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9:30 a.m.

Two major employers in downtown Charlotte have their employees back at work after protests were more peaceful in the wake of the shooting of a man by a city police officer.

Both Duke Energy and Wells Fargo had employees return to work Friday, after three days of protests rocked the city after 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott was shot by a police officer Tuesday afternoon.

Bank of America told its workers to stay home again Friday.

The large employers in the city kept their employees home Thursday, after protesters damaged a number of buildings in the downtown area.

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The above item has been corrected to show that Scott was shot Tuesday, not Monday.

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8:15 a.m.

President Barack Obama says recent reports of unarmed African Americans being shot by police "should be a source of concern for all Americans."

In an interview with ABC's "Good Morning America," Obama declined to address specific cases, although he noted that the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, had invited the Justice Department to investigate the shooting there.

Obama said protesters expressing their frustrations by looting or breaking glass aren't going to "advance the cause" of racial justice. He added, "my hope is that in days to come, people in the community pull together and say, 'How do we do this the right way?'"

He said "it's important for all of us to say we want to get this right."

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6:20 a.m.

Charlotte police have released details on charges against five people in the protests that followed the shooting of a black man by an officer.

Police spokeswoman Cindy Wallace said in a statement that 19-year-old Ian Bowzer is charged with kicking in doors of the Hyatt Hotel downtown Thursday. Bowzer was arrested and charged with injury to real property.

Forty-nine-year-old Daniel Baker is accused of breaking into a downtown restaurant. Baker was arrested and charged with breaking and entering and larceny after breaking and entering.

It wasn't known if the men have attorneys.

Officers have warrants for two other people in that restaurant break-in. They are also charged with breaking and entering, larceny after breaking and entering and conspiracy.

Another man faces similar charges for a break-in at another downtown restaurant Tuesday.