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Merriam-Webster‏ educates Kellyanne Conway on definition of 'fact'

Just in case you weren't clear, "alternative facts" are not a thing.

Counselor to President Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway, prepares to appear on the Sunday morning show Meet The Press, from the north lawn at the White House, Jan. 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.

Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Counselor to President Donald Trump Kellyanne Conway, prepares to appear on the Sunday morning show Meet The Press, from the north lawn at the White House, Jan. 22, 2017 in Washington, DC.

There was an abundance of foot-in-mouth moments for U.S. president Donald Trump during his first two days in office this weekend — the issue of inauguration attendance, his controversial speech at the CIA building, and yes, ‘alternative facts.’

The novel term was coined by Kellyanne Conway, former campaign manager turned Counselor to U.S. president Donald Trump, in an exchange with NBC journalist Chuck Todd.

Interest in the definition “spiked dramatically” on Merriam-Webster‏’s website on Sunday, after Conway appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press defending White House press secretary Sean Spicer's claims about the size of Donald Trump's inauguration crowd.

This prompted the publisher behind the internationally-known dictionary to go on Twitter to help Conway, and anyone else, clear up misconceptions about the word “fact”.

“A fact is a piece of information presented as having objective reality,” they tweeted.

The online dictionary's entry for the term defines a 'fact' as "a piece of information presented as having objective reality."

In his first appearance at the White House briefing room, Spicer claimed Trump’s “was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period."

After being challenged on Spicer’s comments by Todd, this is what Conway said:"You're saying it's a falsehood. And they're giving — Sean Spicer, our press secretary — gave alternative facts,"

The host responded: "Alternative facts aren't facts, they are falsehoods."

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