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Nova Scotia's Syrian refugee chocolate maker turned away at U.S. border

Tareq Hadad was on his way to meet with the governor of Vermont when he was sent back home.

The Hedad family, who brought their chocolate-making expertise from Syria to Canada, met with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when he visited Nova Scotia last year. Tareq Hadad says he was travelling to the U.S. to meet with the governor of Vermont when he was turned away at the border.

Contributed/Peace By Chocolate

The Hedad family, who brought their chocolate-making expertise from Syria to Canada, met with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau when he visited Nova Scotia last year. Tareq Hadad says he was travelling to the U.S. to meet with the governor of Vermont when he was turned away at the border.

MONTPELIER, Vt. — A Syrian chocolate maker who brought his family business from his war-ravaged homeland to Canada says he has been denied entry into the United States where he had planned to meet with the governor of Vermont.

Tareq Hadhad's family arrived in Canada in December 2015 three years after fleeing Syria and soon launched their business, "Peace by Chocolate." The business' website says the family ran a successful chocolate factory in Syria that was destroyed by a missile. The family fled to Lebanon before being invited to Canada.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau spoke of the family's journey during a United Nations speech last year.

Hadhad tells The Associated Press he was turned away at the U.S. border Sunday after being told he didn't have the required documentation.

Hadhad says he still hopes to visit Vermont.

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