News / World

AP News in Brief at 11:04 p.m. EDT

2 Louisiana slayings likely racially motivated, police say

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — The slayings of two black men in Baton Rouge last week were likely racially motivated, police said Sunday, and a suspect — a 23-year-old white man — was in custody. In both shootings the gunman fired from his car then walked up to the victims as they were lying on the ground and fired again multiple times.

The suspect, Kenneth Gleason, was being held on drug charges and was given a $3,500 bond on Sunday evening, a district attorney told The Associated Press. Authorities didn't immediately have enough evidence to arrest him on charges related to the killings, but the investigation was ongoing, Baton Rouge Sgt. L'Jean McKneely told The Associated Press.

Gleason was still jailed as of 6 p.m. Sunday, according to the sheriff's office.

"The victims were ... ambushed," McKneely said. "There is a strong possibility that it could be racially motivated."

McKneely said shell casings from the shootings linked the two slayings, and a car belonging to Gleason fit the description of the vehicle used in the killings. He said authorities had collected other circumstantial evidence but he wouldn't say what it was.

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Police report arrests in 3rd night of demonstrations

ST. LOUIS (AP) — St. Louis police made several arrests Sunday night as protesters broke windows and damaged property during a third night of demonstrations over the acquittal of a white former police officer charged in the shooting death of a black man.

After organizers announced the demonstration had ended, a few dozen people continued to march downtown and some in the crowd started knocking over large potted plants and throwing objects through windows.

Buses carrying police in full riot gear and shields arrived near the downtown location where police said significant property damage was reported following an hours-long nonviolent protest Sunday afternoon and evening.

At least seven people were taken into custody.

Heading into a third night of protests, organizers said they were frustrated that a few people who have caused trouble at night could make it harder to spread their nonviolent message.

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10 Things to Know for Monday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Monday:

1. PROTESTERS RALLY IN ST. LOUIS ON THIRD DAY OF DEMONSTRATIONS

Several hundred protesters march in downtown St. Louis near the city's police headquarters and later through the St. Louis University campus over the acquittal of a white former police officer charged in the shooting death of a black suspect.

2. POLICE SAY 2 LOUISIANA KILLINGS LIKELY RACIALLY MOTIVATED

A suspect — a 23-year-old white man — is in custody in the slayings of two black men in Baton Rouge last week.

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Trump, in new dig, mocks North Korea leader as 'Rocket Man'

SOMERSET, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday mocked the leader of nuclear-armed North Korea as "Rocket Man" while White House advisers said the isolated nation would face destruction unless it shelves its weapons programs and bellicose threats.

Trump's chief diplomat held out hope the North would return to the bargaining table, though the president's envoy to the United Nations said the Security Council had "pretty much exhausted" all its options.

Kim Jong Un has pledged to continue the North's programs, saying his country is nearing its goal of "equilibrium" in military force with the United States.

North Korea will be high on the agenda for world leaders this coming week at the annual meeting of the U.N. General Assembly, Trump's biggest moment on the world stage since his inauguration in January.

Trump is scheduled to address the world body, which he has criticized as weak and incompetent, on Tuesday.

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UK lowers terror threat level as subway bomb probe advances

LONDON (AP) — British police made progress Sunday in their frantic pursuit of suspects and evidence connected to the bomb that partially exploded on a packed London subway, leading counter-terrorism officials to lower the country's threat level because they no longer considered a fresh attack to be imminent.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd announced the downgraded terror threat level hours after London police said a second suspect was in custody and a second property was being searched in connection with Friday's attack that injured 30 people.

Rudd cautioned that the investigation was ongoing and that Britain still faced a substantial threat even though the terror level had been reset to "severe" from "critical."

"Severe still means that an attack is highly likely, so I would urge everybody to be vigilant but not alarmed," she said.

The advancing investigation was welcome news for London commuters who had anticipated heading to work Monday morning while suspects remained at large and police were racing to round them up before they could hit the city again.

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France: Acid attack on 4 US students not seen as terror act

PARIS (AP) — Four American college students were attacked with acid Sunday at a train station in France, but French authorities so far do not think extremist views motivated the 41-year-old woman who was arrested as the alleged assailant, the local prosecutor's office and the students' school said.

Boston College, a private Jesuit university in Massachusetts, said in a statement Sunday that the four female students were treated at a hospital for burns after they were sprayed in the face with acid in the city of Marseille. The statement said the four all were juniors studying abroad, three of them at the college's Paris program.

"It appears that the students are fine, considering the circumstances, though they may require additional treatment for burns," Nick Gozik, who directs Boston College's Office of International Programs. "We have been in contact with the students and their parents and remain in touch with French officials and the U.S. Embassy regarding the incident."

Police in France described the suspect as "disturbed" and said the attack was not thought at this point to be terror-related, according the university's statement.

The Paris prosecutor's office said earlier Sunday that its counter-terrorism division had decided for the time being not to assume jurisdiction for investigating the attack. The prosecutor's office in the capital, which has responsibility for all terror-related cases in France, did not explain the reasoning behind the decision.

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Donald Glover, Julia Louis-Dreyfus take home comedy Emmys

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Donald Glover won the best comedy actor Emmy Award for "Atlanta," which he created and which carries his distinctive voice, while Julia Louis-Dreyfus was honoured Sunday for a sixth time for her role as a self-absorbed politician in the comedy "Veep," named best comedy for the third time.

"I want to thank Trump for making black people No. 1 on the most oppressed list. He's the reason I'm probably up here," Glover said, acknowledging the entertainment industry's and the Emmys' tilt toward the political under President Donald Trump.

Combined with Emmys that Louis-Dreyfus has won for "Seinfeld" and "New Adventures of Old Christine," her latest trophy tied her with Cloris Leachman as the most-winning Emmy performer ever.

"Saturday Night Live" triumphed early for a season of skewering President Donald Trump, while the ceremony and host Stephen Colbert did likewise.

"I remember the first time we won this award," creator Lorne Michaels said in accepting the show's trophy for best variety sketch series. "It was after the first season in 1976. I remember thinking ... this was the high point," and there would never be "another season as crazy, as unpredictable, as frightening, as exhausting or as exhilarating. Turns out I was wrong."

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Top US diplomat says closing embassy in Cuba 'under review'

NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration is considering closing down the recently reopened U.S. Embassy in Havana following a string of unexplained incidents harming the health of American diplomats in Cuba, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday.

Tillerson's comments were the strongest indication to date that the United States might mount a major diplomatic response, potentially jeopardizing the historic restart of relations between the U.S. and Cuba. The two former foes reopened embassies in Washington and Havana in 2015 after a half-century of estrangement.

"We have it under evaluation," Tillerson said of a possible embassy closure. "It's a very serious issue with respect to the harm that certain individuals have suffered. We've brought some of those people home. It's under review."

Of the 21 medically confirmed U.S. victims — diplomats and their families — some have permanent hearing loss or concussions, while others suffered nausea, headaches and ear-ringing. Some are struggling with concentration or common word recall, The Associated Press has reported .

Some victims felt vibrations or heard loud sounds mysteriously audible in only parts of rooms, leading investigators to consider a potential "sonic attack." Others heard nothing but later developed symptoms.

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Politics and Sean Spicer take centre stage at Emmy Awards

NEW YORK (AP) — Weeks after leaving his job, former White House press secretary Sean Spicer was onstage at the Emmy Awards on Sunday joking about one of his first — and more dubious — claims from the press room.

Host Stephen Colbert, playing the straight man in his opening monologue, said it was difficult to tell how many people would be watching the show. At that point, Spicer wheeled a podium onto the Los Angeles stage.

"This will be the largest audience to witness an Emmys period, both in person and around the world," Spicer said. The reference was to his Inauguration Day claims, contradicted by photos, about how big the audience was for President Donald Trump's oath of office.

"Wow," Colbert replied. "That really soothes my fragile ego."

Even without Spicer's surprise appearance, politics couldn't help but make its way onto the Emmy Awards stage, especially since Colbert noted that Trump was the biggest TV star of the year.

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Week 2 in the NFL starts with Irma ceremonies

The Jacksonville Jaguars and Tampa Bay Buccaneers began their games Sunday with tributes to those affected by Hurricane Irma.

Jaguars defensive end Dante Fowler Jr., who grew up in St. Petersburg and played at the University of Florida, carried the state flag onto field.

The Jaguars and first responders held a giant American flag during the national anthem.

Both teams and the Miami Dolphins, who play at the Los Angeles Chargers, wore "ONE FLORIDA" decals on their helmets.

Cynthia Welsh, of Sarasota, said being at the stadium in Tampa restored a sense of normalcy, if only for a few hours.

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