Sports

The Latest: Dayton says he didn't ask for stadium departures

FILE - In this July 22, 2016, file photo, from left to right, Minnesota Vikings co-owners Zygi and Mark Wilf, Gov. Mark Dayton and Michele Kelm-Helgen, the chairwoman of the Minnesota-Sports Facilities Authority, cut the ribbon at the ceremonial grand opening for U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. In a letter Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, Kelm-Helgen resigned after weeks of criticism over the questionable use of luxury suites at the stadium by officials' family and friends.(Leila Navidi/Star Tribune via AP, File)

FILE - In this July 22, 2016, file photo, from left to right, Minnesota Vikings co-owners Zygi and Mark Wilf, Gov. Mark Dayton and Michele Kelm-Helgen, the chairwoman of the Minnesota-Sports Facilities Authority, cut the ribbon at the ceremonial grand opening for U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. In a letter Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017, Kelm-Helgen resigned after weeks of criticism over the questionable use of luxury suites at the stadium by officials' family and friends.(Leila Navidi/Star Tribune via AP, File)

MINNEAPOLIS — The Latest on departures at the authority overseeing management of the Minnesota Vikings' stadium (all times local):

4:10 p.m.

Gov. Mark Dayton says he didn't ask for the resignations of two top leaders from the Minnesota Vikings' stadium oversight authority.

Chairwoman Michele Kelm-Helgen announced her resignation Thursday in a statement, and executive director Ted Mondale followed suit hours later. It follows months of controversy over public officials' use of luxury suites for friends and family members.

Dayton appointed Kelm-Helgen and Mondale. He credited both for recognizing their presence on the authority was becoming a detriment.

The questionable use of suites has fueled legislation from Republicans that would drastically reshape the authority, giving the Legislature power to appoint several members.

Dayton says the remaining four commissioners should remain in place. He says he will likely appoint an interim chair when Kelm-Helgen leaves March 8.

3:20 p.m.

A top House Republican says the two leaders at the Minnesota Vikings' stadium oversight authority made the right move by resigning.

Chairwoman Michele Kelm-Helgen announced her resignation Thursday in a statement, and executive director Ted Mondale followed suit a few hours later. Kelm-Helgen said it was "in the public interest" to leave amid a controversy over public officials' use of luxury suites for friends and family members.

GOP Rep. Sarah Anderson says their resignations were the right decisions. But she says the four remaining commissioners should also consider exiting their posts, saying all were responsible for suite misuse.

Republicans are pushing a bill that would reshape the authority, giving the Legislature more power to appoint its members. Kelm-Helgen and Mondale were appointed by Gov. Mark Dayton.

2:40 p.m.

The executive director of the authority overseeing the Minnesota Vikings' stadium has resigned, joining the chairwoman in leaving after weeks of criticism over questionable use of luxury suites by family and friends.

Ted Mondale announced his resignation from the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Thursday in a statement that came hours after chairwoman Michele Kelm-Helgen resigned.

The authority was targeted by Republicans at the Minnesota Legislature for lack of judgment.

A recent legislative audit found that nearly half of the tickets for a pair of suites controlled by the stadium authority were issued to friends and family of top officials. No laws were broken but GOP lawmakers are pushing to reshape authority governance.

It leaves a leadership vacuum at the oversight board as Minnesota gears up to host the 2018 Super Bowl.

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7:57 a.m.

The chairwoman of the authority overseeing the Minnesota Vikings' stadium has resigned after weeks of criticism over questionable use of luxury suites by family and friends.

Michelle Kelm-Helgen announced her resignation Thursday in a letter in which she said it was "in the public interest" to step down.

A recent legislative audit found that nearly half of the tickets for a pair of suites controlled by the stadium authority were issued to friends and family of top officials.

No state laws were broken, but Republican legislators have been pursuing major changes to the authority structure.