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Rosemary Westwood: The voice of Metro.

Give it up, Canada: We don't need to make Americans love us

I can like America and Americans (which I do, greatly), and even love some of them without assuming, much less requiring, their reverse-interest in the True North.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, takes part in a bilateral meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the APEC Summit in Manila, Philippines on Thursday, November 19, 2015.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, takes part in a bilateral meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the APEC Summit in Manila, Philippines on Thursday, November 19, 2015.

Always the wooer, never the wooed. Canada, I mean, when it comes to the U.S.

All week, Canadian media, swooning over Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s rare (steak?) state dinner at the White House on Thursday, have noted what a “high honour” it is, how it shows that “Canada matters” and promises to be an “evening of awe.”

U.S. President Barack Obama sees himself in Trudeau, we’re told. Plus: The Washington Post even called Trudeau the “anti-Trump” (!) — a moniker Trudeau later ironically embodied when he refused to dump on Trump in an interview.

We’re loving the new attention — the Vogue profile, Sunday night’s 60 Minutes interview, which Americans read as advertisement to emigrate here, not that they needed one after Googling en masse “how to move to Canada” on Super Tuesday. The U.S. coverage, though concerned with Trudeau’s esthetic, is far meatier than the usual Five cool people you didn’t know were Canadian and this street in this Canadian city is so hip.

But coming from a nation that still assumes we’re all lumberjacks, it’s not really that flattering, is it? The Google-search story was roundly treated as a joke: Move to Canada!? Things really are bad! We’re not an aspiration so much as a latch-ditch escape hatch. They’re drawn to the absence of America, not to Canada, which they generally view as a backwoods.

That’s why Trudeau said on 60 minutes that Canadians “like to think that, you know, Americans will pay attention to us from time to time, too.”

What lofty goals, Mr. Trudeau. Americans do like him for his story: He is handsome and forthright and rose to power by being a good guy, a classic trope of American culture rarely seen in real life. But I doubt the interest will plunge much past his shiny surface.

To be clear: Neither Trudeau nor I are anti-American. Hell, he told the Huffington Post that the U.S. is “the greatest democracy in the world.”

I can like America and Americans (which I do, greatly), and even love some of them without assuming, much less requiring, their reverse-interest in the True North.

Besides, while the state dinner will be good for Trudeau, and even a little good for us, the important relationship is no longer with Obama, it’s with his successor. And if that (shudder) is Donald Trump, we know who’ll pick the fight.