Views / Opinion

Much like her father, Ivanka Trump's legacy is on the line: Westwood

This week, New York magazine ran a cover story denouncing Ivanka as a “people’s princess” who was working hard all right, “but for whom?” The answer: herself.

At a recent conference in Berlin on women entrepreneurs, Ivanka Trump was booed for suggesting the president supports women.

Susan Walsh / AP

At a recent conference in Berlin on women entrepreneurs, Ivanka Trump was booed for suggesting the president supports women.

The White House has been tough for a particular Trump lately, and I’m not talk about the Donald.

Sure, he’s feeling “sour and dark,” according to the New York Times, after he blabber-mouthed classified intelligence to the Russians on a whim, either to brag or because he didn’t know better, according to news reports, or maybe both. And sure, that meeting with the Russian foreign minister and U.S. ambassador came on the same day he fired James Comey, the FBI director, which Trump later admitted was related the FBI’s investigation into Russian collusion with Trump’s campaign.

And there was that interview with the Economist that revealed such a limp and unintelligible grasp of economics. And yeah, he has basically sent his spokespeople to the slaughter day in and day out, because he can’t stop tweeting excuses that contradict the story crafted for the press.

Sure, calls for impeachment may be growing, but Trump can only be blamed so far for, well, being Trump. His own staff told the Times that Trump’s inability to concentrate and indifference to detail meant he’d never really be able to hurt the U.S. on intelligence matters, essentially because he’ll never know enough about intelligence matters. That would be the ignorance-as-bliss defence.

But another Trump can certainly be held accountable, and she is.

This week, New York magazine ran a cover story denouncing Ivanka as a “people’s princess” who was working hard all right, “but for whom?” The answer: herself.

Her new book Women Who Work has been roundly panned as vapid, ignorant and useless, containing “more fonts than original thoughts” (Samantha Bee), “a strawberry milkshake of inspirational quotes” (the Times), and “a painfully obvious book basically for no one” (the New Yorker).

At a recent conference in Berlin on women entrepreneurs, she was booed for suggesting the president supports women.

Ivanka Trump entered the White House reportedly with the goal of being a moderating force and a voice for women’s welfare. And while she’s been castigated for her non-existent feminism (“Nobody on earth thinks she's a feminist, are you kidding me?” Gloria Steinem told Refinery 29 last week), she’s also come under increasing criticism for not having that magic fairy dust we were told she possessed, which could turn her father into someone vaguely coherent and less volatile.

A recent Huffington Post column questioned whether Ivanka actually has any liberal principles to speak of, or if she’s simply pretended to care about, say, the environment, for personal gain in business and liberal social circles.

Perhaps she’s “smart,” as the media have repeatedly called her, in the way her father is also “smart.” That would be: great at branding and giving a certain group of people what they want. Her #WomenWhoWork initiative has helped her sell shoes, and the book debuted on the New York Times’ how-to bestseller list at number four. That could be thanks in part to Fox News, which excerpted the book and generally fawns over her as it does her father. Certainly few liberal circles will be featuring it in their book clubs.

Ivanka’s legacy is on the line, as much as her father’s, and if nothing changes, she may meet the same fate: scorned by most and idolized by the far right. Moderating nothing, but selling quite a lot.

More on Metronews.ca